Using fraction cubes for AQE test revision

Fraction cubes are really useful for anyone who struggles with the topic of fractions in AQE test maths.

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Fractions in the AQE test

The topic of fractions is huge at AQE. You need to know about the relationship between fractions, decimals and percentages, how to simplify fractions, all about equivalent fractions and how to use fractions to calculate probability.

There are LOTS of questions involving fractions at AQE, so it’s a great idea to get to grips with the concept early. Fraction cubes are great for visual learners, and for practical pupils who like to learn hands-on.

These ones are colourful and tactile, and using them hands-on often helps children to remember the relationship between fractions.

Where to get fraction cubes?

We chose these ones from Amazon for the AQE test.

Fraction cubes by Learning Resources, Amazon £11.88
Fraction cubes by Learning Resources, Amazon £11.88

 

They’re really simple to use. They come with a leaflet that explains how you can use them to learn about –

  • proper fractions
  • equivalent fractions
  • how to simplify fractions
  • comparing fractions

How can they help with AQE preparation?

Here are some ideas to help you with your AQE test maths.

  • Because these cubes are colour-coded, they can help you visualise fractions. The set includes – one whole, halves, thirds, quarters, fifths, sixths, eighths, tenths and twelfths.
  • The cubes slot in together like toy bricks, so you can add fractions together and compare them.
  • Make and compare equivalent fractions using the bricks – for example, four-sixths is the same as two-thirds. Six-twelfths is the same as one-half.
  • Use these equivalent fractions to simplify – four-eighths equals one-half. Eight-twelfths equals two-thirds.
  • Compare fraction cubes (by height) to see which is larger. For example, one-third is larger than one-quarter.

You’ll find that these are really good, not just for children taking the AQE test, but also for siblings who are just starting out with the concept of fractions. Because they’re fun, like building Lego bricks, they’re tempting to use. They are also a really simple way for you to explain how fractions relate to each other.

Ready to learn more AQE maths topics? Click here.

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